Twenty-Two – Card Game Review

Twenty-Two Gameplay

Twenty-Two Gameplay

I went camping this past weekend. As I mentioned in the Mexican Train domino game review I published the other week, dominoes seem like a good durable piece of gaming equipment for rough terrain and weathered environments. I took my double-twelve domino set on the camping trip and we played a few rounds of Mexican Train. It worked well. The dominoes got very dirty as you might expect, however. I would recommend keeping two sets of dominoes, one for indoor use and another for outdoor use. It also might be good to clean the outdoor dominoes from time to time.

The biggest downside to taking a double-twelve set of dominoes camping is that it significantly adds to the weight I carry on the hiking trail. I have a travel sized double-six domino set that is approximately the size and weight of a pack of playing cards. Games played with double six dominoes I feel are over too quickly and tend to leave me hungry for more, though I have begun browsing through domino game rules that use a double-six set to see if there are any exceptions that will prove me wrong.

In the meantime it seems the most logical piece of gaming equipment to take the place of the double-twelve domino set in a camping situation would be the classic deck of cards. While not as durable, standard decks of playing cards are cheap and easily replaceable. Most importantly they are very light and easy to pack.

My wife gets bored from time to time as was the case last night. When she gets bored she corners me and demands that we play a game together. When we can’t agree on a game, we usually look up a new game neither of us have played. That way we have the greatest potential of being equally bad at something new. And if one of us happens to be naturally good at playing the new game, the other can chalk it up to beginner’s luck without feeling taken advantage of.

Last night’s new game is called Twenty-Two. It is played with a standard deck of 52 cards, four suits ace to king sans jokers. The cards are ranked such that aces are high and twos are low. All suits are equally ranked. Twenty-Two is a trick taking game sort of like Hearts, Spades or Euchre, but with a great deal of difference in objective and strategy of gameplay.

The objective for the player when playing Twenty-Two is to be the last player with a total score less than 22 points. Any number of players can play Twenty-Two. For every six players, simply add another deck of cards. So 2-6 players, play with one deck. For 6-12 players, play with two decks, and so forth. Each player is dealt seven cards by the dealer. The first dealer is chosen by everyone drawing a card from the deck, highest card is dealer, ties are redrawn.

After the cards have been dealt, the players beginning with the player to the left of the dealer, may choose to discard any number of cards up to and including their full hand and redraw that number of cards from the draw pile. If you’ve got good cards you don’t have to do this, but this is probably the most important mechanic of Twenty-Two. If the number of cards in the deck run out before everyone has a chance to do this, the remaining players are out of luck and the first trick begins.

Right player led with three jacks. Left player won the trick with two aces and a king.

Right player led with three jacks. Left player won the trick with two aces and a king.

The player to the left of the dealer begins the first trick. A card or multiple cards of any one rank may be played. In one of our games three jacks were led, but it would have been illegal to begin a trick with two jacks and a queen. Play then continues clockwise with each player attempting to beat or equal the leading cards. For instance, with three jacks led a player could beat the jacks by playing three queens or two queens and a jack. The next player could beat the second player’s play with three kings and so forth. If a player cannot beat the highest valued play in the trick before him, he must play his lowest cards. So if three kings are now the highest valued cards in play, he must play the three lowest cards in his hand.

Left player then leads the second trick with a queen. Right player wins trick with a king.

Left player then leads the second trick with a queen. Right player wins this trick with a king.

As soon as everyone has made their play, the player with the highest ranked play wins the trick. That player then leads the next trick. Any number of cards of the same rank may be played to lead any trick, but the last card in everyone’s hand must always be saved for the last trick. On the last trick, everyone plays their card to see who had the highest card. The player with the highest ranked card, or players in case of a tie, in the final trick lost the round of play. They keep their final card to the side as their score. If they rack up the equivalent of 22 or more points in last round cards, they are eliminated from the game. Number cards are scored at their numeric value. Face cards are worth 10 points, and aces are worth 11 points.

Right player leads third trick with two fives. Unable to beat both fives, the left player plays his two lowest cards.

Right player leads third trick with two fives. Unable to beat both fives, the left player plays his two lowest cards.

The person who lost the round becomes the new dealer who deals out seven cards to each player and play continues in the next round. If there is a tie, the tied players draw for who is dealer; the player with the highest draw becomes dealer. The game continues until all but one player is eliminated from the game. The last player standing is the winner.

In the final trick, the left player has the highest card. He loses and becomes the dealer for the next round.

In the final trick, the left player has the highest card. He loses and becomes the dealer for the next round.

In playing Twenty-Two I found myself having to figure out new strategies I’m not used to in a card game. On one hand, you don’t want to run out of low ranked cards in your hand so you can have the lowest card possible in the final trick. This makes the game kind of like Hearts. On the other hand, if you are not taking tricks, you’re at risk of being forced to play a higher card during the final trick, which makes me want to play the game more like Spades. The need to think about these things while balancing my hand make this game really fascinating. Twenty-Two is an easy to learn and easy to teach card game that can be played in most any setting with any number of players. Because of its versatility, I would recommend this game for any setting where other games are unfeasible due to the size of the group or the difficulty of setup in the physical environment.

Mexican Train – Domino Game Review

Cardinal Mexican Train Domino Kit

Cardinal Mexican Train Domino Kit

Cardinal’s version of Mexican Train is documented to support 2 to 8 players. It is played with a set of double-twelve dominoes. I’ll cover other variations in the future, but this is the one I learned how to play first.

  • With 2, 3, or 4 players, initially draw 15 dominoes each at the beginning of each round.
  • With 5 or 6 players, initially draw 12 dominoes each at the beginning of each round.
  • With 7 or 8 players, initially draw 11 dominoes each at the beginning of each round.

There are thirteen rounds of play, one for each double domino in the set. The dominoes are shuffled and players draw their initial hand out of the pile of dominoes referred to as the bone pile. And whomever has the current round’s double domino places it in the middle of the table. For the first round, the double domino required to start the round would be a double-twelve. For the second round it would be the double-eleven and so forth until the round with the double-blank. If no player in the first round has a double-twelve, each player draws one domino from the bone pile at the same time until someone draws the double-twelve. Once the double-twelve has been played, everyone should have the same number of dominoes in their hand except the person who played the double-twelve. That person will have the same number of dominoes in their hand as everyone else minus one, the missing one being double-twelve that was played.

Play then proceeds clockwise around the table from the person who played the double. In their first turn a player may start their own train. They do this by placing a domino that has a side that matches the current number represented by the starting double. Trains come out of the center like spokes on a wagon wheel. In the first round I would be able to play a domino that has a twelve on it to start my train. If I had no domino with a twelve, I would then have to draw and place a marker on the place where my train would be. In the Cardinal Mexican Train domino set I have, there are small colored plastic train engines provided that may be used as markers. In the past when I didn’t have such frivolous gaming equipment, I would use a penny or bottle cap as a marker. Any sort of token will do.

While the token is on a player’s train, and it must remain there until the player’s next turn, any other player may play on the marked train instead of playing on their own. They may also start the Mexican Train, a public train that anyone may play on. If a player has a marker on their own train, and they play on the Mexican train or someone else’s train, the marker on their own train comes off of their train until such circumstances where it may be put back on their train again.

To review, a player’s turn consists of playing or drawing. If they draw, they must place a marker on their train to indicate it is open for others to play on. Players may play on their own train, a marked train, or the Mexican Train. If the Mexican Train has not been started, it may be started off to the side of the other trains in the same manner the players’ trains were started. If a player plays a double, they may play again. The objective is to run out of dominoes in your own hand.

When a player is down to their last domino, they must tap it on the table to indicate there is a likelihood that they will run out of dominoes in their next turn. This is similar to calling out “Uno!” in Uno. If you get caught not doing this, all the other players may call you names and force you to draw two additional dominoes into your hand.

When a player runs out of dominoes, all of the other players count up the face value of all the other dominoes in their hand. This becomes their score for the round. Scores are summed up and carry forward for each player from round to round. The player with the lowest score after the double-blank round wins the game.

Mexican Train is primarily a game of chance and is fairly easy to learn, which makes it great for children. There are some elements of strategy, however, that can keep it interesting. It is usually best to play your highest point dominoes as early and as frequently as possible so they are not left in your hand by the end of the round.

It’s also good to learn when to be nice and when to let someone stay stuck. In the last game I played, one of my opponents needed a domino she didn’t have and had placed a marker on her train. I had the very domino she needed, but did not provide it since she had fewer dominoes in her hand than I did. I let her sit there for several turns until she had accumulated a hand that was sufficiently and safely larger than my own.

Take care in how you arrange your domino hand since one side of it is somewhat public for others to see. On one hand, you will want to arrange your dominoes in such a way that you have a plan for every one you play so you make the maximum use of each one On the other hand, if people can predict by the way you’re arranging your dominoes which one you plan to play next, and that you are a certain number of turns from going out, they may play accordingly in a manner that is not in your favor. Just some food for thought.

Mexican Train gameplay

Mexican Train game play

Double-twelve dominoes are really easy to find in all sorts of stores. Outside of playing cards, I can’t think of any other piece of gaming equipment that is so versatile in being used to play more distinct kinds of games. Dominoes are also spill and dirt resistant. They are handy for when I want to play games outdoors. I don’t ever worry about getting dominoes dirty. If you don’t already have a domino set and you want to consider yourself a board gamer, then you owe it to yourself to go get one. Mexican Train, is just one of many games you can play with it, though it is a fun one; one I would recommend everyone try.

The Game of Life Adventures – Card Game Review

The Game of Life Adventures Game Box

The Game of Life Adventures Game Box

The Game of Life Adventures is a card game based off of the Game of Life board game of similar name first released by Milton Bradley in 1960. This card game was released by Hasbro in 2014. To setup the game, the players separate out and shuffle the four types of game cards into four distinct decks. The types of cards are family, career, adventure, and wealth. Family cards relate to getting married, having children, etc. Career cards relate to education, careers, and getting paid. Adventure cards are ways the player could make their life more interesting. Wealth cards provide various tangible assets required to fully take advantage of career and adventure cards.

Cards are shuffled into four draw piles.

Cards are shuffled into four draw piles.

The Game of Life Adventures is designed for two to four players. Once the cards are divided into their four distinct color cards, players take turns drawing one card at a time from whichever pile they desire until all players have five cards in their hand. Within the decks there are cards that have a +10 printed on them. These cards indicate that 10 years have passed. If a player draws one of these cards during an initial draw phase, they are placed to the side and the player then redraws. The +10 cards are then reshuffled back into their respective decks.

After all players have their five card hand, play begins with whomever was selected to go first. Within a turn, a player will play a card, tell a story about how that card relates to their fictional life they are creating there within the game, and then draw a new card from any color pile they choose. Some cards have prerequisites that must be satisfied before they may be played. For instance, it is impossible to celebrate a wedding anniversary if you have not yet gotten married.

This is my life.

This is my life.

Every time someone draws a +10 card, ten years have passed within the game. After sixty years, the game ends. I spent my first ten years working on two degrees while my opponent built an igloo and got herself a pet polar bear and a pet shark. I was stunned at how quickly time had flown, so I raced to catch up doing everything interesting I could while I was young. I began a career as a politician and got paid handsomely. This allowed me to plan an extravagant wedding where my spouse and I exchanged vows while sky diving, and we moved into a beach front property where we had our two twin boys.

Meanwhile my opponent became a rock star sensation, rising in the music charts. While I didn’t think much of her music, my campaign staff apparently thought it would help as background music on the campaign trail. Since she apparently didn’t give them permission to use her songs, she sued (by playing a card) and took my house. Given that I am an expert politician, I passed legislation that allowed me to do what I wanted to do and countersued, taking my house back. From that day on, we were rivals.

This is my opponent's life.

This is my opponent’s life.

Twenty years had passed. I wanted to do everything interesting I could. I wanted to make a mark and be somebody. I purchased a car, a boat, and a plane. I circumnavigated the globe. I learned to do a loop-the-loop in my plane. I even took a rocket ship to the moon. But what I hope I will most be remembered for is skydiving from my hot air balloon with a skateboard in my hand so I could skateboard land into a skateboarding contest for charity, which I won by the way.

The years went by. My opponent had three girls, while I had three boys. I suppose we both decided it was time to give back to society. She completed her Ph.D. and became a rocket scientist. After robbing the taxpayer blind I began a rewarding career in teaching that I held until the end of the game.

The game ends when six +10 cards have been played.

The game ends when six +10 cards have been played.

Once the sixth +10 card has been played, the game ends. Each life event card played has a number on it showing how many points it is worth. The player with the most points wins. I felt I had lived the most rewarding life of all with 1055 points. My opponent got 1050 points, so maybe she wasn’t so boring after all.

The Game of Life Adventures card game is a great party game that you can teach newcomers very quickly and have a lot of fun telling stories about your fictional characters. There is more chance than skill involved in this game, so it might be a good title to pull up when you want to play something with someone who is not very confident in their gaming abilities or when you are playing with children who like to talk more about their fanciful in game character than any gaming strategy. Even though there is a scoring system, there is not much about this game that takes itself seriously. It’s a light-hearted bit of fun to have, much like its board game counterpart.