Cat Girl Without Salad – Windows 10 Game First Impressions

Cat Girl Without Salad Title Screen

Cat Girl Without Salad Title Screen

Revenge of the Mutant Camels meets Power Puff Girls in Cat Girl Without Salad developed by WayForward Technologies and released in 2016 as a Humble Bundle Original for the Windows 10 operating system platform. The game was originally an April Fools joke announced in 2013 billed as a game spanning all genres in one title. While my experiences with it thus far have revealed it to be primarily a horizontal side-scrolling shooter, Cat Girl Without Salad parodies familiar game elements from other video games integrated throughout its gameplay.

How to Play

How to Play

The protagonist hero of Cat Girl Without Salad is named Kebako. She is a robotic, ditsy cartoon girl bounty hunter with cat ears flying through space to fight enemies and take down bad guys. She is equipped with a default pea shooter that literally shoots peas. Throughout the game, the player will find what look like game cartridges that upgrade Kebako’s weapons in various ways. Each weapon upgrade is unique, creative, and sometimes annoying.

Starting Pea Shooter

Starting Pea Shooter

There is a platformer gun that shoots a cartoon platformer sprite who jumps on the enemies to kill them. The sports gun shoots golf balls at the enemies based on the direction of the player’s swing. A puzzle gun turns the side-scrolling shooter environment into a scrolling game of Bust-a-Move. An RPG gun opens up a fight menu similar to those encountered in Final Fantasy games where the player can choose to attack or use magic against approaching enemies.

Using the RPG Gun

Using the RPG Gun

I also encountered a dance gun that mimicks the Dance Dance Revolution games made by Konami. Instructions for how to play Cat Girl Without Salad are simple and provided to the player at the beginning of a new game. Guns can be fired using any of the four direction arrow keys on the keyboard. When using the dance gun, if the player times their shots appropriately with the “dance” arrows scrolling across the screen, they can achieve a combo score for each time they time their shot correctly.

Dance, Dance Gun

Dance, Dance Gun

Ice cream sundaes, pizza, cheeseburgers, and any other junk foods may be collected to restore health, but not salads. Suffice it to say, Cat Girl Without Salad is a crazy game. The game characters seem to act like characters from animated television shows aired on Cartoon Network or Nickelodeon to preteen girls. This somehow seems to actually add to its charm. The blasts of bubblegum pink and strobing pastels excite rather than frustrate. Whereas many such cartoons tend to grate on my nerves, the audio in Cat Girl Without Salad is thus far enjoyable. The development team seems to have really known what they were doing and enjoyed doing it.

Am I playing Bust-a-Move or R-Type?

Am I playing Bust-a-Move or R-Type?

For appearing to be geared toward younger girls, whether in fact or as a joke, Cat Girl Without Salad is a legitimately challenging game. It is far from the hardest side-scrolling shooter I have played, but it’s certainly not easy either. The game feels fair, challenging, and the controls are solid. While the weapon types are clever and creative, they are not immediately useful without adequate practice. Expect to play even the first level over again to learn how to get it right.

As I said, Cat Girl Without Salad is a Humble Bundle Original. This means it was made as an exclusive title for those who subscribe to the Humble Bundle Monthly service. When subscribed, it may be downloaded DRM-free to the subscriber’s local machine and launched from a simple executable. If Humble Bundle were to ever no longer be a thing, I could imagine this game would become a rare but coveted title, perhaps like Chex Quest is now.

Let the reader note that after I wrote this article, I saw that Humble Bundle will be removing this game from its Humble Bundle Monthly offering on February 2, 2018. If you’re a Humble Bundle Monthly subscriber, you’ll need to get it before then to play it as part of that packaged deal. Hopefully it will still be available to be purchased in some way after February 2, 2018.

The First Boss

The First Boss

The more I play Cat Girl Without Salad, the more I really like it. It is an addictive side-scrolling shooter that takes the genre to places that are completely different from where its ever been while keeping the core elements familiar, but fresh. If you sign up for a Humble Bundle Monthly subscription, make sure you check out Cat Girl Without Salad.

DuckTales: Remastered – Compatibility

DuckTales: Remastered

DuckTales: Remastered

System Requirements

Operating System: Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo, AMD Athlon 64 X2, or better
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Video: Nvidia GeForce 200, AMD Radeon HD5000, or better. 512 MB Video RAM
Hard Disk: 2 GB

Windows 10

DuckTales: Remastered seems to work flawlessly in Windows 10.

DuckTales: Remastered [Woo-Ooh!] – Windows 7 Game First Impressions

DuckTales: Remastered

DuckTales: Remastered Title Screen

DuckTales: Remastered is a Disney licensed title published by Capcom and developed by WayForward released in 2013 for Valve’s Steam platform. It is a remake of the classic DuckTales for the Nintendo Entertainment System. While I was concerned that Capcom and Disney might be attempting to market this game simply to capitalize on the nostalgia of fans of the classic game, this game appears to be a solid single-player platformer for Windows 7 era PCs. Fans of the show will appreciate getting reacquainted with all of the characters and the plucky humor is true to form for the series.

DuckTales Remastered: Intro Level Tutorial Gameplay

DuckTales: Remastered Intro Level Tutorial

Upon loading the game you are greeted with a title screen with the town of Duckburg in the background. The DuckTales instrumental theme music plays and I couldn’t help but sing along. The original game went straight to a level select screen. This remastered version however begins predictably in the spirit of the animated show with the Beagle Boys breaking into Scrooge McDuck’s Money Bin. McDuck, played by the player, must make his way to the money vault and defeat the boss. This level acts as a sort of tutorial to help the player get familiar with the game’s controls.

For those who are not familiar with playing DuckTales, the player controls Scrooge McDuck throughout the game. Like most platformers, the player may run in the horizontal directions and jump in a vertical arc. The player may also have McDuck use his cane like a pogo stick to get a jump with increased distance or to crush an enemy beneath him. He can also use his cane like a golf stick to whack items in the game.

DuckTales: Remastered First Boss

DuckTales: Remastered First Boss

When I was growing up, having a few friends who owned DuckTales for the NES, the general consensus was that the game was really hard. It appears my concept of hard has changed over the years. I wouldn’t call this an easy game, and it’s probably harder than the original Super Mario Bros., though that may be an apples to oranges comparison. That being said, the game feels fair even while I’m losing, and thus far at no point has felt overwhelmingly difficult. Quite the contrary, every time I have died, I wanted to try again and keep on playing.

Upon defeating the Beagle Boys, it is discovered that they were after a particular painting that contained information hidden in its picture frame as to the whereabouts of large sums of hidden treasures. McDuck punches all of the data into his large treasure hunting computer which then provides the menu screen for the additional levels of the game, segueing into the familiar level select of the original.

DuckTales: Remastered Diving into Money

DuckTales: Remastered Diving into Money

Just like in the original there are five main levels in DuckTales: Remastered: the Amazon, Transylvania, African Mines, the Himalayas, and the Moon. The player can choose to play these levels in any order, so of course I picked the Moon first being the sci-fi adventurer I am. But before I went on my moon mission, I had to take a dive into McDuck’s piles of gold coins. This is actually probably the best part of the game I have played so far. I must have spent several minutes just enjoying making Uncle Scrooge dive into his wealth, drinking in the satisfying jingles.

DuckTales: Remastered Hard to Duck in Space

It’s Hard to Duck in Space

I was impressed to find the moon level plays almost exactly like it did in the NES classic. I’m surprised they did not include a feature where you could switch between the old and new graphics of the levels like they had with the remastered version of The Secret of Monkey Island. Maybe there is more new stuff here than I realize, but the similarity between the two games is shocking. Added to this remastered version are new cut-scenes that provide back story and giving fans of the show new material that fits in with the series.

DuckTales: Remastered Moon Gameplay

DuckTales: Remastered Moon Gameplay

So far I would recommend this game to any fan of the DuckTales animated series and anyone who really enjoys a decent platformer. The voice acting is fantastic and the graphics have received a worthy face lift. While there is nothing here particularly groundbreaking, given that the platformer genre has seen a great deal of changes and innovations since 1989, the game play continues to hold up well and provides a great deal of entertainment in our current decade. The simplicity of the controls may also make it an obvious choice for those who are unfamiliar and new to playing 2D platformers.